Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Nessie Reviewed

"...come with me now as we take a trek into the dark and turbulent domain of Nessie, the world's most supernatural monster."

So says Nick Redfern in the introduction of his new book, "Nessie." In some ways, it's a big promise, but as usual, Redfern delivers.

The Loch Ness Monster is one of the world's most famous cryptids. Over the years, there have been countless books published examining various theories to explain what the monster may be. That being the case, one has to wonder, what exactly a new book on the topic may have to offer. Sadly missing among the various publications of recent years, has been a close look at the supernatural elements and possibilities related to the creature. This, is what Nick has brought to the table with his latest foray.

Back in the 1960's, the late Frederick W. "Ted" Holiday, another Brit who was intrigued by the monster, wrote "The Great Orm of Loch Ness: A Practical Inquiry into the Nature and Habits of Water-Monsters" Holiday used the term "Orm," roughly meaning "worm" as a launching point to delve into a theory that the creatures in Loch Ness, and in other lochs, were actually giant worms. Almost as soon as he published the theory, Holiday was off delving into other possibilities. Possibilities that the creatures were something more akin to the paranormal world rather than flesh and blood beasts.

Redfern delves into Holiday's work, paying tribute in a sense, but in some ways, it feels like he picked up the threads still hanging from questions Holiday brought up. Redfern brings in other fascinating aspects to the Loch Ness mystery as well, covering other researchers, and the numerous odd incidents that have unfolded in recent years. This in fact, is where the strength of the book lies.

UFOs? Check.

Dragon Cults? Check.

The "Great Beast" aka Aleister Crowley? Check.

The Exorcism of Loch Ness? Check.

And there's more, much more.

While many researchers insist that, if there is indeed a creature in Loch Ness, it must be a physical animal, the vast amount of strange occurrences around the loch over the years point to even more intriguing possibilities. It's this range of alternative information relating to Nessie and her environs that Redfern ably delves into in this volume. As with any good book in the fortean field, Nick offers some speculations and stimulates the inquiring mind, leaving more mysteries for us to explore.

As someone long intrigued by the creature and the Loch itself, I've read most, maybe all, of the material published over the years. But even if you're a veteran Nessie aficionado, you'll love this book as a "refresher" course on the weirder aspects of the legend and you might find a few gems you haven't heard much about previously.

Check out Nessie, it's another great offering from Nick Redfern.



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